Showing 10 of 18 results for "feed"

 

  • Feed Grain Partnership

    The Feed Grain Partenership (FGP) 1GR2was formed to bring together organisations with involvement in the Australian feed grain industry so that a whole supply chain Research and Development strategy could be developed based on industry guidance, and by integrating the resources of Research and Development Agencies. The members of the FGP are AECL, Grains Research Development Corporation, Meat and Livestock Australia, Australian Pork Limited, the Pork CRC, Dairy Australia, Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation– Chicken Meat Program and the Stock Feed Manufacturers Council of Australia.

  • Nutritional value of pearl millet as poultry feed

    DAQ 243JADue to the prediction that Australia will have to import significant quantities of feed grains which will inevitably lead to higher prices, it is essential that research be undertaken to find alternative feed sources for livestock, especially poultry, to reduce the increased cost of feeds and maintain an internationally competitive poultry industry. As current Australian millet varieties have never been evaluated as a feed grain for poultry, the main objective of this project was to examine the potential of two millet varieties (Katherine pearl millet and Siberian millet) as poultry feed ingredient. The results demonstrate that Katherine pearl millet could be incorporated into the diets of hens without any adverse effect on layer performance or egg production. 

  • The net energy values of the Australian feed ingredients for poultry

    UNE 82JThis publication contains data on the net energy values of some cereal grains and vegetable protein sources that are commonly used in the Australian poultry broiler and layer industries. It presents preliminary comparative results on performance of broilers fed diets formulated using net energy (NE) and apparent metabolisable energy (AME) values.

  • Effects of commercial feed enzymes in wheat-based diets on egg and egg shell quality in imported strains of laying hen

    UNE 77AAt the time of commencement of this project, very little research had been conducted into feeding layer hens and results were not consistent among studies of the benefits of adding commercial feed enzyme preparations to the diets of laying hens. This report was conducted to evaluate these benefits and provide Australian egg producers with scientific data to evaluate the processes themselves and carry out an internal cost-benefit analysis.

  • Feedworks Conference 2010

    Feedworks 1801Feedworks is a partnership that markets products, services and technology to enhance the profitability in animal production systems. Four presentations given at the 2010 Feedworks conference are attached in the vodcast links below.

  • Feedworks Conference 2010

    Feedworks 1801Feedworks is a partnership that markets products, services and technology to enhance the profitability in animal production systems. Four presentations given at the 2010 Feedworks conference are attached in the vodcast links below.

  • Effects of diet composition, gut microbial status and feed forms on cannibalism in layers

    UNE 72AAThe project aimed to identify both nutritional and husbandry factors that may contribute to increase cannibalism, and to develop strategies to minimise it.

  • The effects of time off feed and water on the welfare of spent laying hens - Phase 2: Behavioural indicators

    1UM122AThis project aimed to equate physiological changes induced by water deprivation with behavioural changes in order to understand its welfare implications for the transport of spent laying hens.
    The results presented in this report, in accordance with the previous study (MCCP: 2009-320), questions the welfare of hens that have water withdrawn for 24h or longer. It should be recognised that factors other than feed and water deprivation are likely to influence hen welfare during transport, such as the health status of the hens prior to loading, their body condition, stress of handling, social stress of mixing, duration of transport and the weather during transport and lairage. The threshold indicative of acceptable welfare remains debatable depending on value-based judgements.

  • The effects of time off feed and water on the welfare of spent laying hens - Phase 2: Behavioural indicators

    1UM122AThis project aimed to equate physiological changes induced by water deprivation with behavioural changes in order to understand its welfare implications for the transport of spent laying hens.
    The results presented in this report, in accordance with the previous study (MCCP: 2009-320), questions the welfare of hens that have water withdrawn for 24h or longer. It should be recognised that factors other than feed and water deprivation are likely to influence hen welfare during transport, such as the health status of the hens prior to loading, their body condition, stress of handling, social stress of mixing, duration of transport and the weather during transport and lairage. The threshold indicative of acceptable welfare remains debatable depending on value-based judgements.

  • Pullet and layer flock uniformity: an epidemiological industry-based approach to improve feed efficiency

    FLHSThis research project aimed to investigate the variability among farms and flocks, for flock growth rates and uniformity, and to establish benchmarks of industry performance. Some laboratory modelling was undertaken on important issues to clarify causal relationships that can then be compared to data obtained from the cross sectional and experimental farm studies. The project showed that high peak production and good persistency of production can be achieved in flocks with an average body weight of 1.8-1.85 kg at 30-40 weeks of age.

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