Showing 10 of 26 results for "laying hens"

 

  • Available phosphorus requirement of laying hens

    1UQ101Two experiments were conducted to determine the available phosphorus (AP) requirement of laying hens and to examine the effect of different dietary AP and calcium (Ca) concentrations on egg production and egg shell quality from the start of lay to 80 weeks of age. The influence of dietary phytase supplementation was also examined. The established adequate Ca and phosphorus (P) levels for layers have been challenged due to the continuous advances in genetic improvement, nutrition, environment, and management.
    A high level of egg production was maintained in both experiments and it appears that all the dietary AP concentrations met the P requirement of hens even at the lowest level of 1.5 g/kg diet (for hens fed wheat and sorghum based diets). The results obtained from the present study are in agreement with overseas reports, which suggest that modern laying hen strains have much lower AP requirements than earlier strains.

  • The importance of nests for the welfare of laying hens

    VA01As the majority of hens in Australia are housed in cages, which is a controversial animal welfare issue for the egg industry, an analysis of nest boxes and their use by laying hens is an important aspect of understanding the effect on bird welfare, behaviour, and ultimately, egg production. 

  • A Comparative Study of the Nutritive Values of Triticale and Wheat for Laying Hens

    IMG 2This study examines whether  wheat can be substituted by triticale, a generally cheaper cereal grain, without prejudice to performance of the flock or egg quality. The results show that while triticale is a useful alternative to wheat for inclusion in diets for laying hens, the particular sample of triticale used in the study was somewhat inferior in nutritive value compared to the wheat - judging by small losses in laying performance.

  • A Comparative Study of the Nutritive Values of Triticale and Wheat for Laying Hens

    IMG 2This study examines whether  wheat can be substituted by triticale, a generally cheaper cereal grain, without prejudice to performance of the flock or egg quality. The results show that while triticale is a useful alternative to wheat for inclusion in diets for laying hens, the particular sample of triticale used in the study was somewhat inferior in nutritive value compared to the wheat - judging by small losses in laying performance.

  • Alternative protein sources for laying hens

    IMG 3The need to expand the protein options available to the poultry industry was the catalyst for this study. The increasing worldwide demand for chicken, particularly in developing countries, will mean that the poultry industry will need to come up with agriculturally and economically sustainable feedstuffs that will provide chickens with protein.

  • Studies of Cloacal Haemorrhage, Vent Trauma and Beak Trimming in the Laying Hen

    DAV 170AAThe long-term objective of this research program is to develop a world best practice to achieve peak egg production and to reduce mortalities to 2-3% in birds with intact beaks. 

  • Importance of rearing environment, space and nests for laying hens in cages

    1UM091Due to the widespread interest of the general public in the treatment of animals, this project was conducted to determine the effects of floor space during rearing and adulthood of laying hens. There was no convincing evidence that reduced space and deprivation of nest boxes resulted in suffering, based on normality of biological functioning and preferences for space and nest boxes.

  • Hindgut function in laying hens

    UNC 12AAThis report details a series of experiments designed to provide evidence of a fermentative acidosis caused in the hindgut gut of layer-type birds after changes in their diet, and the development of a commercial feed enzyme.

  • Controlling Vent Trauma With Stockwound Sprays

    DAW 68ARecent studies found that vent cannibalism was the biggest cause of loss in laying hens. Beak trimming, at two life stage intervals has been used as a means of controlling the problem. However, there is limited information available on the effects of a second beak trimming on subsequent egg production. 

  • Nutritive value of Lupins for laying hens

    DAS 44AAThe overall aim of this research project was to provide producers and feed formulators with clear guidelines on the economics of using whole and de-hulled lupins and the need for inclusion of enzymes in layer diets containing lupins.

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